Hi! I am Jason. This is a personal blog.

That means I post according to my whims, so while I have some consistent likes, you should expect to see any random thing on this blog.

Frequent content: Faberry, Achele, also how much I hate Glee. Lately: obsessed with ouat, sleeping warrior and confused as heck but intrigued by swan queen. basically my fandoms normally have this in common: lesbians

other topics: Buffy, hot womens, Bioware games, Tomb Raider, Skyrim, Adventure Time, cuttlefish, octopuses (of course!), science stuff, and whatever the heck else I want to put on my blog. :-P Just remember: be prepared for anything.

 

penw0man asked
What do you mean by "councidence can't be used to solve his problems"? do you mind elaborating thanks:)

maxkirin:

Hello there, writerly friend~

For those of you wondering, this question has to do with the quote I posted earlier today:

image

So, what is the point of this quote? Well, the thing is. Storytelling is most effective when there is drama, and danger, and something at risk. It’s okay to have coincidence worsen a character’s day. If your character is trying to escape from prison it’s entirely fine to have coincidence get in the way. Oh, you know the 8:00PM patrol? Well they just decided to patrol at 7:50PM so your plan just went to hell.

This is good. If tension was an element— it would be fire, and the only way to keep that flame going is to keep feeding it drama and danger. This is why the climax of a story is practically a firestorm, everything that could’ve gone wrong goes wrong, and the characters have to attempt to survive against all odds.

This is what telling stories is about: drama and danger.

People tend to think that a story ‘needs’ combat, and death, and cataclysmic events to make a climax interesting— and that is the wrong way to look at things. It’s not about conflict— it’s about something being at stake. An engaging story needs to have something in the balance— and no, it doesn’t have to be the fate of the world. It can be a character’s dream of fame, or their hope for a better future.

This is why it is okay to have things go wrong, it’s more fuel to the fire.

Now, that being said… Why is it bad to solve problems through coincidence? Because you are throwing a bucket of water on your book’s tension. Let’s go back to the example I mentioned prior.

Your character is trying to escape from prison, but the 8:00PM patrol is ten minutes early. The whole plan just went to hell— except, just as the patrol is walking towards their cell, the patrol says “Wait, I forgot to take my break” and turns around.

It would be like a horror movie where the main character is running away from the killer— and then suddenly trips, they are left defenseless, they’re going to die, they’re done for, except— wait, they just found a gun in the bushes. What a stroke of luck!

Or what a way to kill the tension.

Some of you may be nodding your head and saying "This sounds like Deus Ex Machina, Max talked about this not so long ago" and you would be right. Having things unexpectedly get better is pretty much what Deus Ex Machina is, if you want to learn more about that, you can click on that link.

Now, I have encountered a lot of young writers in the past who have difficulty with this lesson— and I understand. Sometimes you feel like you have walked yourself into a corner. That you can’t write anymore, and that you need a quick fix.

Thankfully, I have just the thing for you. You know what to do when you think you’ve walked yourself into a corner? Have things go wrong.

Seriously.

Have things go wrong, and write them without fear. Trust your characters, meet them by the fire, and I can promise you that you will find a way out together. But, please— please, do not throw water on the fire. Don’t go for easy or quick fixes. Write dangerously. Follow your characters into hell.

It will be more fun that way c;

nytylys:

kill the idea that openly caring characters are boring

set on fire the line of thought that dictates that altruism is a bad thing and that selfishness/sassiness is an inherently more appealing and ‘~intricate~’ quality than an affectionate nature

smash and bury the concept of the false equivalency between angst and complexity

kindness and empathy are not synonyms for “blandness” and “lack of personality”

seekingwillow:

theumbrellaseller:

adapt canon. twist canon. pick up the story and drop it in another place, another time. rethink gender, sexuality, race. cut open a little hole in another universe and push the story inside. retcon the ending, switch up the genre, make it tragic, make it happily-ever-after. knock the characters out of moral alignment. debunk stereotypes, subvert tropes. kidnap and liberate the story from oppressors.

___

This might explain why all my fanfic is fixfic.

cosmokyrin:

Pfft. I do weird things past midnight. Like, why make a freaking throne out of the marching band’s common instruments? And in case someone asks, she’s sitting on a timpani, and the armrests are not-so-obvious xylophones lol

And of course I’m never sure if those instruments could actually carry anybody’s weight :P

Yeah so I do these mock-up covers sometimes (of my favorite fanfictions). It’s a bad habit, actually, lelz.

Also my typography sucks.

P.S.

Shoutout to arendelledrummajor because I think I found my first Tumblr crush

How dare I confess. I might regret posting this P.S. later because it’s around  4:20am here

takitakos:

My personal approach to the fic r9kElsa is Suffering by the wonderful Kate—-Kane.

No spoilers, I just made up a chapter, probably located before the story takes place. I just NEEDED some fluff out of somewhere to help me take the angst. Hope it works for all you readers too.

Also, GIFed for your pleasure and my practise.

(Reblog, do not repost. Please?)

yeahwriters:

5 Books on Writing That Every Writer Should Read
To be a better writer, there are really only things that you need to do: Read, and write. But that doesn’t mean that you can’t read about being a writer, and that having a well-rounded understanding of how writing “works” isn’t beneficial.
These 5 books were all assigned to me as a creative writing undergrad, and all have pieces of wisdom in them that have etched themselves so thoroughly into my brain that I feel like they’re all floating over my head while I’m writing.
I specifically chose these because they aren’t all just saying “here’s how I write, you should do it too”—the topics of these books are very diverse!
1. Reading Like A Writer by Francine Prose: Like I said, the best thing you can do to be a better writer is read. But what does that mean? What should you read? Francine Prose (yes, that is her real last name, if you can even believe it!) helps you answer those questions, and shows how looking for certain things while you read and reread can strengthen your own writing. Check it!
2. On Writing by Stephen King: This is the one book on my list that is saying “here’s how I write, you should too”. But Stephen King is basically the most prolific writer ever, so I was happy to listen to his advice. Two points of his really stuck with me: 1. Adverbs are lazy and 2. Sometimes the best thing you can do for a story is put it down for a long time—like, 6 months or a year—and come back to it with eyes so fresh that it’s like you’re editing someone else’s story. I’d be interested to know what points of his sticks with you guys!
3. Bird by Bird by Anne Lamott: I posted about this the other day, but this book is like my writing Bible. In fact, a friend of mine who doesn’t even write got to reading it, and he loved it, too. Basically if you’re a human with a goal, this book will help you. And Anne Lamott writes kinda like this wise, kind mother who isn’t afraid to also tell you what’s up. Whereas a lot of other books on writing are about the actual storytelling, I like this book because it’s more about the writer’s “lifestyle”. Go get it now so that we can gush together!
4. The Philosophy of Composition by Edgar Allan Poe: This is actually just an essay, but considering that Poe is often credited with being the inventor of the modern short story, I had to include it on this list. It’s in this essay that Poe famously defined a short story as one that can be told in one sitting. Whereas King’s On Writing is really “zoomed in” on topics like word choice, this essay is a high level, theoretical piece on what a story actually is. You can get it for 99 cents on Kindle, or, even better, read it as part of a collection of all of his stories… ugh, they’re SO good!!!
5. Elements of Style by Strunk & White: I cannot tell you how often I’ve received this little book as a gift—for high school graduation, for college graduation, and for many Christmases and birthdays. But it’s all good because it is kinda essential for a writer to have. Elements of Style is all about—gasp!—grammar. (I should probably give it a read-through again so that I can re-center and remember my grammatical skillz, actually!) Also, there are some cute versions out now that make it seem less snore-fest-y—I really want this illustrated copy!
If you read any of these books and post quotes from them on your Tumblr, tag them #yeahwritebooks and I’ll reblog you!

yeahwriters:

5 Books on Writing That Every Writer Should Read

To be a better writer, there are really only things that you need to do: Read, and write. But that doesn’t mean that you can’t read about being a writer, and that having a well-rounded understanding of how writing “works” isn’t beneficial.

These 5 books were all assigned to me as a creative writing undergrad, and all have pieces of wisdom in them that have etched themselves so thoroughly into my brain that I feel like they’re all floating over my head while I’m writing.

I specifically chose these because they aren’t all just saying “here’s how I write, you should do it too”the topics of these books are very diverse!

1. Reading Like A Writer by Francine Prose: Like I said, the best thing you can do to be a better writer is read. But what does that mean? What should you read? Francine Prose (yes, that is her real last name, if you can even believe it!) helps you answer those questions, and shows how looking for certain things while you read and reread can strengthen your own writing. Check it!

2. On Writing by Stephen King: This is the one book on my list that is saying “here’s how I write, you should too”. But Stephen King is basically the most prolific writer ever, so I was happy to listen to his advice. Two points of his really stuck with me: 1. Adverbs are lazy and 2. Sometimes the best thing you can do for a story is put it down for a long timelike, 6 months or a yearand come back to it with eyes so fresh that it’s like you’re editing someone else’s story. I’d be interested to know what points of his sticks with you guys!

3. Bird by Bird by Anne Lamott: I posted about this the other day, but this book is like my writing Bible. In fact, a friend of mine who doesn’t even write got to reading it, and he loved it, too. Basically if you’re a human with a goal, this book will help you. And Anne Lamott writes kinda like this wise, kind mother who isn’t afraid to also tell you what’s up. Whereas a lot of other books on writing are about the actual storytelling, I like this book because it’s more about the writer’s “lifestyle”. Go get it now so that we can gush together!

4. The Philosophy of Composition by Edgar Allan Poe: This is actually just an essay, but considering that Poe is often credited with being the inventor of the modern short story, I had to include it on this list. It’s in this essay that Poe famously defined a short story as one that can be told in one sitting. Whereas King’s On Writing is really “zoomed in” on topics like word choice, this essay is a high level, theoretical piece on what a story actually is. You can get it for 99 cents on Kindle, or, even better, read it as part of a collection of all of his stories… ugh, they’re SO good!!!

5. Elements of Style by Strunk & White: I cannot tell you how often I’ve received this little book as a giftfor high school graduation, for college graduation, and for many Christmases and birthdays. But it’s all good because it is kinda essential for a writer to have. Elements of Style is all aboutgasp!grammar. (I should probably give it a read-through again so that I can re-center and remember my grammatical skillz, actually!) Also, there are some cute versions out now that make it seem less snore-fest-yI really want this illustrated copy!

If you read any of these books and post quotes from them on your Tumblr, tag them #yeahwritebooks and I’ll reblog you!

Haven’t Forgotten My Way Home by itsfaberrytaboo

The residents of McKinley House are broken, damaged in some of the worst ways possible. It is in this place that Rachel discovers Quinn Fabray, shattered at the hands of a man who didn’t know how to wield his power. Can Rachel coax Quinn back into the world that once so terrified her, and show her the true meaning of care and submission?

relax-o-vision:

It always strikes me as funny when fanfic authors put “nsfw” in the comments or tags.

Like…. you’re at work…. reading fanfiction…. does it REALLY matter if there’s sex in it?

Irked fans produce fanfic like irritated oysters produce pearls.

Jacqueline Lichtenberg in Fic by Anne Jamison (via treizquatorz)

crystalzelda:

everyone’s got that couple of fanfics that you just read over and over even though you practically know it by heart because it’s so perfect it’s like a favorite book and you just catch yourself clicking to a random chapter on it because it’s so good it’s comforting to reread it

Crap is a sign of life. New bad stories are a sign that this genre — fan fiction, the genre I adore the most - is alive and well. Bad stories mean new people are trying to write in it, and people are trying to do new things with it, and maybe new people are joining the audience, too. When only the best and most popular are writing in a genre, it’s on its deathbed. (See: Westerns and Louis L’Amour.) I want this genre to be here forever, because I want to read it forever. So I’m happy that teenagers are posting Mary Sue stories to the Archive of Our Own.

Does that mean you have to be happy? Nope. I can’t make you do anything. (I can think you’re wrong, but hey, being wrong on the internet is a time-honored tradition among our people.) But when you start making fun of a writer and bullying her in the comments of her story, simply because she’s writing something you think is bad and embarrassing, well, that’s when I say: shut the fuck up or get the fuck out. Because she’s not a problem. She’s just doing what we’re all doing — having fun, playing with words, throwing something out there on the internet to see if other people like it.

But you. You’re trying to stop someone from having fun. You’re trying to shame people into not writing anymore. And that, folks — that is the definition of shitty behavior. (Mary Sue fantasies, on the other hand, are just the definition of human behavior.) It’s bad for people, it’s bad for the future, and it’s bad for the genre. So you’re a problem.

thefourthvine - In Defense of Bad Writing (via jerakeenc)

This? Is really, really important (not re: me, as I am old, mean, and soulless, but re: writers who are not old, mean, and soulless), especially when you are talking about public commentary, and especially when you are talking about commentary that is unsolicited.

If you really want to improve the quality of Fic At Large, by all means, strike up relationships where you can have meaningful dialogues with other writers and provide trustworthy and meaningful commentary on their work, and (ideally! mutual beta love is the best love!) where they can do the same for you. In fact, if such a concept tickles your fancy, I know of a writing/making shit club that you might find interesting! But there is a world of difference between participating in a community in which people mutually solicit and provide suggestions for one another to help each other out, and leaving mean, snarky, abusive comments directly on someone else’s fic.

This is extra extra true if you could be construed as being in a position of power relative to them, which, if they are a new writer and you are not, you are.

(via fizzygins)

I do not have enough words or reaction gifs to truly emphasize just how incredibly, incredibly important this is.  The culture of mocking fanfiction on the internet (which almost always entails mocking girls when they write, and particularly young girls) is toxic and really sexist at its core, and, in a culture that mocks literally almost anything and everything young girls do, takes away one more space for young girls to do things.  And those spaces are really, really important, because they’re places where young girls are creating and sharing things because they want to—they have a vested interest in this thing, and are taking a really big risk by trying something new (writing) and sharing it publicly (AO3, FF.net, wherever) for others to read (who are, more often than not, strangers, even in fandom communities).  And mocking that process or leaving vitriolic, spiteful comments, mocks the girl who took that risk.  And that’s teaching her to not take risks; to not share her work; to not, in fact, write or create ever again.  And that’s the most detrimental thing you can do—to a girl, to a community, to a genre, and to art and creating in general.

(via ally-wonderland)

also i’d like to note that there’s some painfully obvious self-insert, painfully badly written slash

some of it with an original male character, even

but it doesn’t get attacked like mary sue fic

which sends the message that girls and women can only find safety in identifying with male characters and living out their fantasies through male avatars

you’re not safe as a woman. what you want is wrong when channeled through a woman character. it’s only okay to want things if you imagine yourself male

trying to live out fantasies through a female avatar is evil and wrong and disgusting and deserved to be shamed into the ground

and that is sick and twisted shit

and ain’t nobody gonna convince me the overwhelming popularity of dudeslash isn’t pernicious while that double-standard exists

are there women and girls who would independently enjoy fantasizing through male characters in dudelsash if there weren’t that obvious, coercive fandom pressure?

of course

but as long as the pressure is there, you cannot fucking tell me it’s not shaping how women and girls feel and where they direct their pleasure and you cannot pretend that the predominance of dudelsash is entirely innocent and simply a byproduct of female fans following their bliss

not when certain avenues of bliss are ruthlessly cut off by misogynistic hate

(via mswyrr)

decencybedamned:

HELLO FANFIC AUTHORS IT’S TIME FOR A VOCAB LESSON

  • wantonsexually immodest or promiscuous
  • wontona type of dumpling commonly found in Chinese cuisines

YOUR CHARACTERS SHOULD NOT BE MOANING LIKE A CHINESE DUMPLING OKAY THANK YOU AND GOOD NIGHT

k-y-h-u:

A bunch of little pics I sketched inspired/depicted from nightworldlove’s amazing AU Korrasami fanfic The Game is On (In which Korra is the star quarterback football player & Asami is the head cheerleader for the team (who had a huge crush on Korra ohohoho)

I decided to draw Korra taller than Asami for this.

To my surprise, I’m completely ok with it ʘ‿ʘ